GEORGIA RUTH
Me, aged three. In Cosmeston Park. With a swan. 

Me, aged three. In Cosmeston Park. With a swan. 

Y mae hen ddihareb Rwsiaidd sy’n dweud,
‘nid croesi cae yw byw.’
Cywir: croesi traeth ydyw
Croesi Traeth - Gwyn Thomas
This looks a lot more promising. Country collection thrown together (undoubtedly in a heady swell of cigarette smoke and nonchalance) from French perspective. Someone has written “Jean Paul” on the back in immaculate handwriting. And there’s a version of Wildwood Flower by The Shady Oak Boys. And, Happy Cow-Boy by the incredibly named Oklahoma Wranglers. Le Far-Ouest, c’est chouette…

This looks a lot more promising. Country collection thrown together (undoubtedly in a heady swell of cigarette smoke and nonchalance) from French perspective. Someone has written “Jean Paul” on the back in immaculate handwriting. And there’s a version of Wildwood Flower by The Shady Oak Boys. And, Happy Cow-Boy by the incredibly named Oklahoma Wranglers. Le Far-Ouest, c’est chouette…

45 Found in Paris last week. Undoubtedly going to be terrible. But sold itself on the merits of its cover image alone!

45 Found in Paris last week. Undoubtedly going to be terrible. But sold itself on the merits of its cover image alone!

Last day of Cob Records, Bangor / Diwrnod ola Cob

Last day of Cob Records, Bangor / Diwrnod ola Cob

Official video for Bones. Shot and directed by Keri Collins, March 2012. 

Overheard at Joan Baez concert

Her: “she certainly wasn’t a servant, she was a fully qualified nurse”
Him: “well, it’s so hard to find the right person these days: a resilient saint”
Her: “yes, you know how it is - there’s nothing to do these days, but watch”

Hazardous Pilgrimages



Proust and I are not well-acquainted. I know his name, can spell it, glibly delivering fragments of half-remembered sentences (gardens, beds, beds of roses) stolen from other people’s mouths. But recently, he has put me in mind of gorse. The shrub. From Middle English gorst. Synonyms: furze and whin. The swarming yellow mass - which, I’m reliably informed, is a member of the pea family (oh, secret shame) - has reappeared in my life, unrepentant and still beautiful. For the first time in years, I bent down to smell it.

And it got me thinking. We don’t seem to cultivate gorse in Cardiff. We didn’t in London, or Brighton. In Aberystwyth, it chose to gather on the highest part of Constitution Hill: but sporadically. Litmus paper would probably explain the reasons; but I think it has to do with a deficiency of ravens. Because ravens and gorse flowers go hand in hand (beak in bud). It was my father who first identified the connection. Years ago, walking through Rhoshirwaen lanes in heavy peninsula heat, mayflies in our eyes, the smell of the flowers would hit the back of the throat before we turned the bend and saw them. It’s better than honeysuckle, the smell: more peppery, dusty, fast. And we’d look at the gorse bushes, and my father would point at the sky (vast and constant) and sure enough, we’d see a black shape circling. Sometimes two of them. “Ravens,” he’d say, pausing, “and gorse”: as if the equation were something a nine year old needed to recognise in order to meander on through life. But I only half-remembered. 

 

An anagram of ‘gorse’ is ‘goers’. People who go. Walkers, doers, breathers of clean air (maybe). Last week, along open common-land heavy with flowers I went back in time. And so to Proust, and the terrifyingly large book (7 volumes) which continues to nail my kitchen table into the carpet. Which I bought out of piety and guilt. In Remembrance of Things Past, or À La Recherche du Temps Perdu, he writes:
 

 “Poets claim that we recapture for a moment the self that we were long ago when we enter some house or garden in which we used to live in our youth. But these are most hazardous pilgrimages, which end as often in disappointment as in success. It is in ourselves that we should rather seek to find those fixed places, contemporaneous with different years.”


I’m not so sure. You can revisit the past with your body intact. Things are never as we remember them, I’ll give him that. And so we may return to the real-time heat of a winding lane strewn with gold, that had turned gauzy and permanent in our memories, only to find that the road had never curved at d. but rather at h. To find the ravens gone (to find that they were never there at all, except that one time, on a different road; that we had made ravens of linnets). But in having to reassess memories built from badly-remembered pictures, we assemble new ones. On a path leading out of Nant Gwrtheyrn, I will superimpose ravens to hang above the gorse (which in my memory will be sharp as pepper, but which in reality smelt of empty buds and paper).

Yesterday, I asked my father about the road, and the ravens, and a song which he used to sing as we walked. “Did you sing it?” I asked him, “or have I made that up?” And he wrote back to me, saying: “I can always smell the warm gorse and hear the buzzing of the may bees whenever I hear it.” And so the place is fixed again. “You remember how the tune went?” he asks. And it’s soldered on my brain. “Yep,” I write back. Though I hadn’t thought about it for years. (The beauty of folk songs is that you can change the tune a little, if you like. But it’s always nearly the same. And the nearly-remembering is good enough. It’s not a hazard to admit that you may have slipped a note, or forgotten a word somewhere along the way). And I did go back there, to 1997: albeit via a different path, in a different month, on the other side of a peninsula, with no ravens. That other road was never far behind. 




I rose before dawn today, heard the birds outside the window for the first time since I moved to 55a, and caught a train to Severn Tunnel Junction just in time to see the sun inching over Newport factories. I met Keri Collins, the super excellent film-maker who gamely took on the task of shooting this video, and we drove a couple of miles to Wentwood forest, drowning in strange mists. I saw a buzzard (later, at the end, we found a sad little bird’s egg smashed open on the floor). And then - in prime dogging territory - we plunged into the thickets to start filming. I’m pretty excited to see the results.. The 1930s dress and the mist gave everything a Yellow Wallpaper / Bell Jar ”decadent-madness” feel. And, without knowing it, Wentwood has some pretty incredible history. The Romans were very much there. There are standing stones in Keri’s back garden, a few miles down the road. The pines look as if they’ve been there for centuries (though, of course, they probably haven’t). The whole place vibrates with this strange otherworldy - and almost hallowed - quiet. It suits the song well, I think. And I’ll let you all know when the video is ready.

I rose before dawn today, heard the birds outside the window for the first time since I moved to 55a, and caught a train to Severn Tunnel Junction just in time to see the sun inching over Newport factories. I met Keri Collins, the super excellent film-maker who gamely took on the task of shooting this video, and we drove a couple of miles to Wentwood forest, drowning in strange mists. I saw a buzzard (later, at the end, we found a sad little bird’s egg smashed open on the floor). And then - in prime dogging territory - we plunged into the thickets to start filming. I’m pretty excited to see the results.. The 1930s dress and the mist gave everything a Yellow Wallpaper / Bell Jar ”decadent-madness” feel. And, without knowing it, Wentwood has some pretty incredible history. The Romans were very much there. There are standing stones in Keri’s back garden, a few miles down the road. The pines look as if they’ve been there for centuries (though, of course, they probably haven’t). The whole place vibrates with this strange otherworldy - and almost hallowed - quiet. It suits the song well, I think. And I’ll let you all know when the video is ready.

Let’s get this harp-show on the road!

Let’s get this harp-show on the road!

Upcoming Shows



The band and I will playing a number of dates over the coming months. Harps, Rolands and Reed Organs happily in tow. Hope to see you there!

  • 13 March: Club Fandango @ The Bull & Gate, London
  • 16 March: Clwb Ifor Bach, Cardiff (Official EP Launch w. Evening Chorus / Cowbois Rhos Botwnnog)
  • 24 March: Cob Records, Bangor 
  • 26 March: The Castle, Manchester
  • 31 March: BBC Radio Wales - Welsh Music Day
  • 4 April: Institute of Directors, Cardiff (with Peter Finch, poet)
  • 6 April: Pesda Roc, Bethesda
  • 13 April: Huw Stephens yn Cyflwyno @ London Welsh Club
  • 14 April: Laugharne Festival
  • 19 April: Focus Wales, Wrexham
  • 8 May: Huw Stephens Presents @ The Social, London
  • 18 August: GREEN MAN FESTIVAL